My Career and Me

August 24, 2011 under Syllabus 2011-2012

Summary

How does my career define me? Am I happy with my career? Looking for change or reaffirmation? Do I have the right balance of work & family?

Objective

Who is the same job as they were five years ago? Who will be in the same job in five years from now? There are no more 35 year jobs anymore. We are in a different economy than our father’s. Today’s career is mobile and dynamic.

We all need plans (1, 3 & 5 year plans). We need to be always transitioning to the next phase of our career. Every day, we are constructing our exit ramps. Networking is key in a “small” city like Cincinnati.

As a provider for our family, we have a responsibility to provide through a working career both contingency and growth. However, we have to achieve that with humility and balance.

Bible Readings

1. Jeremiah 29:11-14

For I know well the plans I have in mind for you-oracle of the LORD-plans for your welfare and not for woe, so as to give you a future of hope. When you call me, and come and pray to me, I will listen to you. When you look for me, you will find me. Yes, when you seek me with all your heart, I will let you find me—oracle of the LORD and I will change your lot; I will gather you together from all the nations and all the places to which I have banished you-oracle of the LORD-and bring you back to the place from which I have exiled you.

2. Proverbs 24:27

Prepare your outside work, Make it fit for yourself in the field; And afterward build your house.

Catechism Readings

1. Paragraphs 2427-2429

2427 Human work proceeds directly from persons created in the image of God and called to prolong the work of creation by subduing the earth, both with and for one another.210 Hence work is a duty: “If any one will not work, let him not eat.”211 Work honors the Creator’s gifts and the talents received from him. It can also be redemptive. By enduring the hardship of work212 in union with Jesus, the carpenter of Nazareth and the one crucified on Calvary, man collaborates in a certain fashion with the Son of God in his redemptive work. He shows himself to be a disciple of Christ by carrying the cross, daily, in the work he is called to accomplish. Work can be a means of sanctification and a way of animating earthly realities with the Spirit of Christ.

2428 In work, the person exercises and fulfills in part the potential inscribed in his nature. The primordial value of labor stems from man himself, its author and its beneficiary. Work is for man, not man for work.

Everyone should be able to draw from work the means of providing for his life and that of his family, and of serving the human community.

2429 Everyone has the right of economic initiative; everyone should make legitimate use of his talents to contribute to the abundance that will benefit all and to harvest the just fruits of his labor. He should seek to observe regulations issued by legitimate authority for the sake of the common good.

Small Group Questions

1. Have you had a career change in recent years? How did it affect your family?

2. Does your current job align with long term plans?

Recommended Resources

1. “What Color is My Parachute?” by Dick Bolles

2. “Dream Manager” by Matthew Kelly

3. http://www.adultmentor.com

4. Balancing Work and Family
http://umaine.edu/publications/4186e/

Accountability

1. Go through “Dream Manager” activity or similar program.

2. Discuss goals with wife and family.

Author(s)

Walt Moll & Anthony Your

Included Resources

Work-life balance: Tips to reclaim control
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/work-life-balance/WL00056

There was a time when the boundaries between work and home were fairly clear. Today, however, work is likely to invade your personal life — and maintaining work-life balance is no simple task. Still, work-life balance isn’t out of reach. Start by evaluating your relationship to work. Then apply specific strategies to help you strike a healthier balance.

Married to your work? Consider the cost

It can be tempting to rack up hours at work, especially if you’re trying to earn a promotion or manage an ever-increasing workload. Sometimes overtime may even be required. If you’re spending most of your time working, though, your home life will take a hit. Consider the consequences of poor work-life balance:

· Fatigue. When you’re tired, your ability to work productively and think clearly may suffer — which could take a toll on your professional reputation or lead to dangerous or costly mistakes.

· Lost time with friends and loved ones. If you’re working too much, you may miss important family events or milestones. This can leave you feeling left out and may harm relationships with your loved ones. It’s also difficult to nurture friendships if you’re always working.

· Increased expectations. If you regularly work extra hours, you may be given more responsibility. This may lead to only more concerns and challenges.

Strike a better work-life balance

As long as you’re working, juggling the demands of career and personal life will probably be an ongoing challenge. Use these ideas to help you find the work-life balance that’s best for you:

· Track your time. Track everything you do for one week, including work-related and personal activities. Decide what’s necessary and what satisfies you the most. Cut or delegate activities you don’t enjoy or can’t handle — or share your concerns and possible solutions with your employer or others.

· Take advantage of your options. Ask your employer about flex hours, a compressed workweek, job sharing, telecommuting or other scheduling flexibility. The more control you have over your hours, the less stressed you’re likely to be.

· Learn to say no. Whether it’s a co-worker asking you to spearhead an extra project or your child’s teacher asking you to manage the class play, remember that it’s OK to respectfully say no. When you quit doing the things you do only out of guilt or a false sense of obligation, you’ll make more room in your life for the activities that are meaningful to you and bring you joy.

· Leave work at work. With the technology to connect to anyone at any time from virtually anywhere, there may be no boundary between work and home — unless you create it. Make a conscious decision to separate work time from personal time. When you’re with your family, for instance, turn off your cell phone and put away your laptop computer.

· Manage your time. Organize household tasks efficiently, such as running errands in batches or doing a load of laundry every day, rather than saving it all for your day off. Put family events on a weekly family calendar and keep a daily to-do list. Do what needs to be done and let the rest go. Limit time-consuming misunderstandings by communicating clearly and listening carefully. Take notes if necessary.

· Bolster your support system. At work, join forces with co-workers who can cover for you — and vice versa — when family conflicts arise. At home, enlist trusted friends and loved ones to pitch in with child care or household responsibilities when you need to work overtime or travel.

· Nurture yourself. Eat healthy foods, include physical activity in your daily routine and get enough sleep. Set aside time each day for an activity that you enjoy, such as practicing yoga or reading. Better yet, discover activities you can do with your partner, family or friends — such as hiking, dancing or taking cooking classes.

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